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Be Cuul without the JUUL

Published: November 15, 2018

Electronic nicotine delivery systems (ENDS), or e-cigarettes, are battery powered devices used to deliver nicotine and flavored oils in the form of an aerosol. Most e-cigarettes contain nicotine, which is highly addictive and can harm brain development, which continues until approximately age 25.

It’s introduction to the market in 2015, the e-cigarette brand JUUL has escalated in popularity with young people. According to results from a survey conducted in April 2018 by the Truth Initiative, nearly one in five middle and high school students surveyed have seen JUUL used in school.

With flavors such as Cool Cucumber, Fruit Medley, Mango, and Mint:  JUUL users may not be aware of the product’s high concentration of nicotine.  The e-liquid in JUUL contains nicotine salts which are found in the tobacco leaf, instead of free-base nicotine used in the majority of ENDS. One JUUL pod contains as much nicotine as a pack of traditional cigarettes. According to the CDC, young people who use any type of e-cigarettes may be more likely to become users of combustible tobacco products.

Parents, educators, and health care professionals all play an important role in reducing and preventing ENDS use by young people.  Learning about the different types of ENDS products available, talking about the risks, and setting a positive example by being smoke free are just a few things parents can do. Educators play an important role by implementing smoke and ENDS free policies for campus and school sponsored activities. Healthcare providers can incorporate questions about ENDS as part of tobacco use history at every visit. Together we can strive to make the next generation nicotine and tobacco free.

 

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Be Cuul without the JUUL

Electronic nicotine delivery systems (ENDS), or e-cigarettes, are battery powered devices used to deliver nicotine and flavored oils in the form of an aerosol. Most e-Cigarettes contain nicotine, which is highly addictive and can harm brain development, which continues until approximately age 25. 

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